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10% Of Women Saving To Redecorate

Many women clearly find having a well-decorated home very important to them, as ten per cent of females are currently saving up for home improvement projects, from installing a new kitchen to fitting new bathroom tiles in Hertfordshire.

Recent findings from Marcus by Goldman Sachs revealed while women are more likely to put aside money every month for their interior plans, men are also keen to improve their residence.

Indeed, eight per cent of the 5,000 UK adults who took part in the survey claimed they were saving for big home improvement jobs, revealed Property Reporter.

To help British homeowners make their redecorating dreams a reality, the online bank offered some tips on how to build up their savings nest as quickly as possible.

It emphasised the importance of setting a budget when it comes to the DIY project by conducting research and getting price comparisons. Once a budget has been established, the financial services provider warned Brits to “stick to it to avoid costs escalating”.

Marcus by Goldman Sachs also reminded households to control their spending by up-cycling furniture they already have instead of buying everything new, or updating rooms through simple redecorating ideas as opposed to re-designing them entirely.

Once a realistic budget has been set, it is wise to “commit to saving a certain amount each month”.

“Whether it’s £10, or £100, it will gradually add up and get you that bit closer to your dream home,” a spokesperson for the bank recommended.

It was also advised to get a savings account with a good interest rate to make the most of the money saved.

This advice is especially important after a OnePoll survey, commissioned by Swinton Insurance, recently revealed UK adults save for ten years before they can afford their forever home, Property Wire reported. Therefore, they could save a lot of money by updating the house they already own instead of moving.